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  • All fields: Oconaluftee Indian Village
(71 results)



Display: 20

    • Oconaluftee Indian Village: demonstrators

    • Parris, John, 1914-1999
    • This undated photograph by John Parris depicts craftspeople working at the Oconaluftee Indian Village, a recreated 1750s Cherokee village. At right, Guy Littlejohn holds a broadaxe, commonly used to remove the bark of trees and roughly shape wood. ...
    • Oconaluftee Indian Village: Jim Conseen

    • unknown
    • This photograph shows a Cherokee woodworker, Jim Conseen demonstrating at the Oconaluftee Indian Village. Located on the Qualla Boundary, lands belonging to the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, the village features recreated Cherokee dwellings...
    • Oconaluftee Indian Village: Mabel Bigmeat

    • unknown
    • This photograph shows a Cherokee potter, Mabel Bigmeat Swimmer (1925-1991) demonstrating at the Oconaluftee Indian Village. Located on the Qualla Boundary, lands belonging to the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, the village features recreated...
    • Oconaluftee Indian Village: Amanda Swimmer

    • unknown
    • This photograph shows Cherokee potter Amanda Swimmer (b. 1921) demonstrating at the Oconaluftee Indian Village. Located on the Qualla Boundary, lands belonging to the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, the village features recreated Cherokee...
    • Oconaluftee Indian Village: demonstrators

    • Parris, John, 1914-1999
    • This undated photograph by John Parris depicts craftspeople working at the Oconaluftee Indian Village, a recreation of a 1750s Cherokee village. From left to right, the artisans are: Richard Crowe, Molly Sequoyah, Mary Shelly, an unidentified woman...
    • Pottery: vase

    • Swimmer, Mabel Bigmeat
    • This undated blackware pottery vase was made by Mabel Bigmeat Swimmer. Mabel Bigmeat was raised on Wrights Creek in the Painttown community of Cherokee, North Carolina. A member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, she was a third-generation...
    • Pottery: water jug

    • Wahnetah, Cora Arch, 1907-1986;
    • This undated water jug was made by Cora Arch Wahnetah (1907-1986), a renowned Cherokee potter who learned to make pottery in the traditional way from her mother, Ella Arch. Typically, she used the coil method to form her pots and paddle stamped...
    • Pottery: bowl

    • Swimmer, Amanda Sequoyah, 1921-
    • This undated earthenware bowl was made by Amanda Sequoyah Swimmer (b. 1921), a self-taught potter of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. The youngest of 12 children, she was born and raised in the Straight Fork section of Big Cove, a remote...
    • Pottery: vase

    • Wahnetah, Cora Arch, 1907-1986;
    • This undated vase was made by Cora Arch Wahnetah (1907-1986), a renowned Cherokee potter who learned to make pottery in the traditional way from her mother, Ella Arch. Typically, she used the coil method to form her pots and paddle stamped them to...
    • Pottery: bowl

    • Wahnetah, Cora Arch, 1907-1986;
    • This undated bowl was made by Cora Arch Wahnetah (1907-1986), a renowned Cherokee potter who learned to make pottery in the traditional way from her mother, Ella Arch. Typically, she used the coil method to form her pots and paddle stamped them to...
    • Pottery: vase

    • Wahnetah, Cora Arch, 1907-1986;
    • This undated vase was made by Cora Arch Wahnetah (1907-1986), a renowned Cherokee potter who learned to make pottery in the traditional way from her mother, Ella Arch. Typically, she used the coil method to form her pots and paddle stamped them to...
    • Pottery: vase

    • Wahnetah, Cora Arch, 1907-1986;
    • This undated vase was made by Cora Arch Wahnetah (1907-1986), a renowned Cherokee potter who learned to make pottery in the traditional way from her mother, Ella Arch. Typically, she used the coil method to form her pots and paddle stamped them to...
    • Minda Wolfe

    • United States. Indian Arts and Crafts Board
    • This Indian Arts and Crafts Board photograph is of Cherokee basket weaver Minda Wolfe. Minda Hill Sequoyah Wolfe (1897-1983) was part an active basket weaving family. Her sister, Alice Sequoyah Walkingstick demonstrated basketry at the...
    • Pottery: effigy pot

    • Swimmer, Amanda Sequoyah, 1921-
    • This undated earthenware effigy pot was made by Amanda Sequoyah Swimmer, a self-taught potter of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. The youngest of 12 children, she was born in 1921 and raised in the Straight Fork section of Big Cove, a remote...
    • Pottery: water jug

    • Swimmer, Amanda Sequoyah, 1921-
    • This earthenware water jug was made in 1991 by Amanda Sequoyah Swimmer, a self-taught potter of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. The youngest of 12 children, she was born in 1921 and raised in the Straight Fork section of Big Cove, a remote...
    • Pottery: vase

    • Swimmer, Amanda Sequoyah, 1921-
    • This undated earthenware vase was made by Amanda Sequoyah Swimmer, a self-taught potter of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. The youngest of 12 children, she was born in 1921 and raised in the Straight Fork section of Big Cove, a remote...
    • Contemporary Craft Adaptations

    • United States. Indian Arts and Crafts Board
    • Born and raised in the Swimmer Branch section of the Qualla Boundary, William Lossiah (b. 1937) is a craftsman of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. His mother, Betty Lossiah was a basket weaver; his father, Thomas Lossiah was a medicine man who...

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